John Abdo's Ultimate Performance Library

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Sins of the Mind

AAAAAAAAA dramatic example of purging the destructive negative energy that inhabits many a person’s brain and body is gratifyingly depicted in the blockbuster film inspired by a Stephen King novel called The Green Mile, appearing Tom Hanks. John Coffey, played by Michael Clarke Duncan, is an enormous yet humble muscular black man who was wrongly convicted of raping and killing two young white girls. Coffey, who was discriminately sentenced to death, realizes the judicial and penal systems have closed the book on him leaving the actual offender of these crimes at large.

In addition to being a simple and kind man, Coffey possessed extraordinary healing powers. Under eyewitness accounts by the prison guards, Coffey resurrects a dead mouse lying on the jailhouse floor and healed the terminally ill wife of the prison Warden by swallowing the negative energy stored in her body. When asked how he was able to perform such miracles, Coffey replied in his strong Southern draw, “I took it back”.

Countless gifted people throughout history, who have been declared healers, are known to command sin to egress from another person’s body resulting in instantaneous exorcisms, or healings. According to many faiths, the use of the word ‘sin’ is merely referring to a person’s negative thoughts and beliefs, or Prompters, according to U.S. Anderson, the author of Three Magic Words. Other healers actually use their own bodies as intermediaries, exorcising the negative energy out from the ‘sinners’ body and absorbing it into themselves, or, as Coffey put it, taking it back.

———————–

brain cellsOne day, as another death row inmate frighteningly staggered down the green mile; the long green-tiled corridor that leads to the execution chamber, the convict makes several desperate attempts to stall his execution as the guards are escorting him toward his expiration. The prisoner has a heavy burden on his mind and in his heart but knows it’s too late to disclose. In this moment of despair the prisoner is overwhelmed with guilt, especially as he nears Coffey’s cell. Then, unexpectedly, the inmate reaches out to touch Coffey. Instantly, Coffey psychically senses an explosive surge of negative energy penetrate into his body, immediately realizing he’s face-to-face with the rapist and killer of those two young girls who was, coincidentally, convicted of another crime. Coffey, who’s witnessed plenty of evil acts and injustice in his life, sinks deeper into his melancholy state of consciousness realizing he cannot escape evil, but rather, his life has been constantly surrounded by it.

Heal Thyself:

During his long agonizing prison stay waiting his own final day, Coffey witnesses multiple evil and sadistic acts on other prisoners by a guard named Percy Wetmore. One incident was during an actual execution in which Wetmore was in charge of preparing the prisoner for the electric chair. To quickly deliver a humanely applied life-ending electrical surge into the prisoner, a black hood is placed over the prisoners’ head and face to block the potential expulsion of their eyeballs, blood, saliva and vomit, while an electrocution head cap is fixed on top of their head. Before the electricity is activated, the bottom of this cap that contacts the skull must be saturated with water by the guard, as water serves as the conductor of electric current. However, Wetmore, deviously and sadistically intentionally places a dry cap onto the prisoners’ head so he could purposely observe a much slower, inhumane and sadistic execution. This evil act did not go unnoticed by Coffey, which sickened his emotions by the cruelty one man can inflict on another.

Not too long after the intentionally botched execution, and during a routine cell check, Coffey had the opportunity to grab ahold of Wetmore. As Coffey pinned the evil guard down on the cold prison floor he regurgitated the negative energy he swallowed from the Wardens’ terminally ill wife and transferred it down Wetmore’s throat. Instantly, Wetmore collapsed into a permanent state of catatonia, subsequently needing to be admitted into a mental institution for the remainder of his life. When interrogated why he would do such a thing, Coffey replied, “I punish them bad men.”

The other prison guards were certain Coffey was innocent of the crimes he was convicted of. Knowing they would risk their jobs and reputation, the guards still desired to help Coffey escape. When they found their chance to let him run free outside of the prison walls they told Coffey, “Go ahead. Run for your life John Coffey”. But Coffey stayed still and replied; “There’s too much pain in the world. I’m rightly tired of the pain.”

On the day of his execution, Coffey asked the guards if they wouldn’t cover his head with the black hood. The guards curiously asked this muscular giant of a man, “Why?” Coffey replied, “I’m scared of the dark.” Coffey was properly executed by electrocution.

The moral of this story is whatever you decide for yourself. Maybe there’s more than one moral, maybe the moral today will not be the same moral you’ll have tomorrow. The mind evolves.

(Taken from Brain Sensation & Motivation, Abdo, ©, All Rights Reserved.

December 9, 2015 - Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , ,

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